Art Kavanagh

  
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Introduction

Welcome

Since January 2017, I’ve been posting most of my writing on Medium. During that time, I’ve been giving priority to fiction, particularly shorter forms. I’ve also posted a couple of pieces of what I’ve been loosely calling literary criticism, though maybe just “criticism” would be a more accurate term. Two of those have been among my most viewed (and read) posts on the site, and are still available here. The other two, both essays on poetry, are perhaps a bit heavy going for Medium and can be found on this site (see Criticism and book discussion below).

And here's a list of blogs and personal websites that I like and recommend.

My posts about aphantasia

Apart from fiction and criticism, I’ve written an accidental series on the subject of aphantasia, since recognizing in March or April 2018 that I have that condition. (I’m using “condition” in the widest conceivable sense, as equivalent to “state”, and not to imply that aphantasia is a medical condition or impairment.) Up to January 2019, I published those posts on Medium, the most recent one is on this site. Here is the list of posts so far — I'll update it if and when I add more.

My fiction on Medium

I've made a list of my own stories on Medium. It includes several short stories, a novella and a novel, all of which are free to read. As a bonus, here is the shortest story I've written so far, “Closure”. It comes in at about 750 words. I originally posted it on Medium but deleted it last year and now I've reposted it here.

Recent posts

Some of my posts on Medium
Here is a list of some of my posts on Medium that I think are worth keeping and that don’t fit into the broader categories of fiction, aphantasia or critical book discussion. The bulk of them date from 2017/2018, and most of them are about writing and/or publishing.

Heather Sellers: Learning the lessons of face-blindness and place-blindness
A professor of creative writing can’t recognize faces or find her way around places she knows well. Her approach to dealing with this difficulty is something we can all learn from.

Music distribution formats
I’ve just ordered a CD for the first time in 3 years and I’m wondering if I should do it more often. The things I don’t like about downloads are the absence of physical liner notes and careless, inconsistent or wrongheaded metadata.

In defence of flow: a response to Barbara Gail Montero
Professor Montero makes a persuasive case against the notion that excellence or mastery in performance can be achieved effortlessly, in an ecstatic state of altered consciousness. In spite of this, I’m not yet quite ready to give up the idea of “flow”.

The good old days of the web may be just around the corner
We need to go back to the future of the worldwide web. A follow-up to my article on LinkedIn, Advertising and the future of surveillance capitalism.

Mixed feelings about web discovery
I’ve been using Mix, Garrett Camp’s web discovery engine and successor to StumbleUpon, since February 2018, but earlier this week I deactivated my account.

I was not born to follow
Why I think “following” isn’t a very satisfactory model, either for social media or the open web. Unexpectedly (to me at least), this turns out to be a follow-up to my recent post about Google and the future of search.

Living without Amazon
It’s four months since I deleted my Amazon account. Getting by without ordering from the online retailer is at worst a minor inconvenience.

Older posts.

Criticism and book discussion

This section is for links to my writing about other writing — in particular fiction, poetry and (conceivably, eventually) drama. At the moment, I’m for the most part alternating between two projects. The first is to turn my doctoral thesis (“Andrew Marvell’s ambivalence about justice”) into something more widely accessible; the second to examine how some authors have been able to maintain interest in the same or connected characters over a series of crime fiction novels.

“Oh my god, shut up”: Sally Rooney, short story writer
Before she was an acclaimed novelist, Sally Rooney was already a very impressive short story writer. Here, I discuss three of her stories which can be read on the web.

“What course and opinion he thinks the safest”: Religion and divine justice in the work of Andrew Marvell
A by-product of my thesis, which was about justice as a theme in Marvell’s works. That topic was suggested to me by a book about his treatment of divine justice but I found that Marvell’s writings about divine justice engaged with theodicy only incidentally.

Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go
Restrained and understated it may be. but when you look closely Kazuo Ishiguro’s sixth novel is a horror story.

Robert Galbraith, Lethal White
Nearly 18 months ago, I wrote a post on Medium in which I argued that each of the first three Cormoran Strike novels explores a different trope or sub-genre of crime fiction. Now, at long last, I’ve added my thoughts on the fourth novel in Robert Galbraith’s series.

Liz Nugent, Skin Deep
I previously wrote a mini-review of Liz Nugent’s Lying in Wait which you can find on the book reviews page. Here‘s a slightly more substantial discussion of her more recent novel.

Andrew Marvell’s Gender
This is an essay that I published in Essays in Criticism in 2016. As the title suggests, it looks at how gender informs Andrew Marvell’s writing. The version I’ve posted here is a HTML conversion of the approved draft. The final, definitive version is on the journal’s website. That’s the version that should be cited, of course.

Gillian Flynn's plotting in Dark Places: The deceptive attraction of overkill
My discussion of the plot of Gillian Flynn's second novel, Dark Places (2009).

Rereading Kate Atkinson's Behind the Scenes at the Museum
Kate Atkinson’s first novel has a narrator who falls into three different types, each pulling in different directions. This results in a “teeming”, overstuffed tale whose profusion of detail tends to compensate for or distract from a glaring gap in the narrator’s memory. It’s a novel that requires to be reread.

Finite though unbounded: the abolition of infinity in the poetry of William Empson
A long essay (originally 5,000 words, but it seems to have stretched a bit over the years) about a theme in the early poetry of William Empson, which I wrote in 1996 and now think is worth resurrecting in a very slightly revised form.

The paradoxical ambition of Andrew Marvell’s Third Advice to a Painter
This is an argument (really a by-product of my thesis) about one of Marvell’s satires.

Who really killed The General’s Daughter?
A discussion of the resolution of the plot of Nelson DeMille’s 1992 novel The General’s Daughter.

Robert Galbraith’s Cormoran Strike books
This post deals with tropes and subgenres in the first three Cormoran Strike books. For Lethal White, see above.

Book reviews

Most of the book reviews from Goodreads that I think are worth keeping have now been moved to this site.

Micro.blog

I use Micro.blog mainly as an alternative to Twitter but from time to time I post longer pieces there. Here is a list of some of my longer posts which I don’t necessarily want to see buried in the timeline.